One In Five American Children Go Hungry and are Malnourished

By , Forbes

The U.S. faces a child hunger problem of massive proportions. Advocacy groups repeat over and over that 16.2 million children (one in five) “struggle with hunger in the United States.” 

While the Super Committee stalemates, Congress debates whether pizzas should be counted as a vegetable in school lunch programs. The Occupy Wall Street crowd deplores childhood hunger as “violence against children.” Liberals complain that Rush Limbaugh jokes about childhood poverty. Sinister pizza, cola, and salt lobbyists block valiant efforts to make school lunches healthier.

  • 18% of American children – some 13.3 million – were living in poverty in 2016, making up almost a third of the total poor;
  • more than one in five homeless people are children, including 1.3 million school students who were without a home during the academic year;
  • infant mortality, at 5.8 deaths per 1,000 live births, is almost 50% higher than other advanced nations;
  • the US ranks 25th out of 29 industrialized countries in terms of the amount it invests in young children.

Profitable multinational corporations receive three times as much welfare from the federal government as poor people do. Profitable corporations get $170b in handouts each year from our taxes, think about that for a second.

Public food stamps and school free lunch programs are colossal failures.  Despite their wide reach into poor communities, they apparently leave more than thirty percent of school children “struggling with hunger.”

The official arbiter of family nutrition is the U. S. Department of Agriculture. Its annual survey classifies families as “food secure”, “food insecure”, and “very low food secure.” It publishes no direct measure of “hunger,” only of what it calls “food security.” The details of the survey are found in the statistical appendix to the annual survey – a document that few read.

“One in five children are going to bed hungry in this country every night. That is a crime. That is a crime in this country” said Bob Beckel, Fox News commentator and former Deputy Assistant Secretary of State in the Carter administration. 

13 million kids in America aren’t getting the food they need
By No Kid Hungry

48.8 million Americans—including 13 million children— live in households that lack the means to get enough nutritious food on a regular basis. As a result, they struggle with hunger at some time during the year.

Food-Insecure Families

Food insecurity—the limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe food— exists in 17.2 million households in America, 3.9 million of them with children.

Rates of food insecurity are substantially higher than the national average among households with incomes near or below the federal poverty line, among households with children headed by single parents (35.1% of female-headed households with children are food-insecure) and among Black and Hispanic households.

Food insecurity is most common in large cities but still exists in rural areas, suburbs and other outlying areas around large cities

− 25 % of households with children living in large cities are food-insecure.

The typical (median) food-secure household spent 27 percent more for food than the typical food-insecure household of the same size and composition.

59% of food-insecure households reported that in the previous month they had participated in one or more of the three largest federal food and nutrition assistance programs: SNAP (formerly food stamps), School Lunch and WIC.

Shocking Need: American Kids Go Hungry
By Kimberly Brow, ABC News

Click here for full coverage of Hunger at Home: Crisis in America

Donate here: Feeding America

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