Drug cartels funded DEA sex parties

By ABCNews

Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents participated in “sex parties” with prostitutes paid for by drug cartels for a period of several years, according to a report released by the Justice Department’s watchdog group.

Seven of the 10 DEA agents involved, most who held “top secret” clearance, admitted to attending the parties and some were suspended as a result, the Justice Department’s inspector general inquiry found. The report does not specify where the parties occurred, but many news outlets have said they took place in Colombia.

“Many of these agents were alleged to have engaged in this high-risk sexual behavior while at their government-leased quarters, raising the possibility that DEA equipment and information also may have been compromised as a result of the agents’ conduct,” said the 131-page report by Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz. The report, a review of sexual misconduct allegations in the DOJ’s four law enforcement agencies, found widespread mismanagement at the DEA, the FBI, the U.S. Marshals Service and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. The investigation came in response to 2012 allegations the Secret Service and DEA agents used prostitutes in Cartagena, Colombia. Overall, the report linked the law enforcement agencies to 26 allegations during a four-year period that ended in 2012. Of that, the DEA was involved in 19. Among the other findings: — DEA agents were provided “money, expensive gifts and weapons from drug cartel members.”

Local police “also alleged providing protection for the DEA agents’ weapons and property during the parties,” the report said. — An ATF Director of Industry Operations who holds top security clearance modified a hotel room door “to facilitate sexual play” with anonymous people while on assignment.

“In addition, the DIO removed smoke detectors from the hotel room and inadvertently caused damage to the hotel’s centralized fire detection system,” the report said. He later pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor “fire prevention interference” charge. He was suspended for 14 days, but still works for the ATF with “top secret” security clearance.

— A U.S. Deputy Marshal on assignment in Thailand could not be reached by phone. Every time State Department officials tried to contact him, “two women with heavy foreign accents answered the phone and stated (he) could not be disturbed.” The State Department official later confirmed one of the women was a prostitute.

Drugs Are Better and Cheaper Than Ever By Rebecca McCray, Jason Koebler, Reuters

Heroin, cocaine, and marijuana are just as available, far cheaper, and more potent than they were at the start of the War on Drugs, according to a new study.

We’ve known for far too long that the War on Drugs has been a failure, but the statistics reported in the British Medical Journal by Evan Wood, of the University of British Columbia’s Urban Health Research Initiative, are astounding. Wood and his team aggregated government drug surveillance data from seven different countries. Between 1990 and 2010, the street price, adjusting for inflation, of heroin, cocaine, and marijuana fell roughly 80 percent. At the same time, the street drugs became much more potent: The average purity of heroin increased by 60 percent, the purity of cocaine increased by 11 percent, and the potency of cannabis increased 161 percent. The story is much the same in Europe and Australia, with street prices dropping and supply remaining stable, despite a huge increase in drug seizures.

Though we’ve known that weed is stronger than ever, it seems like the trend has extended to other, harder drugs.

New data shows drug policy isn’t doing what it’s meant to. The war on drugs drastically altered the face of the federal prison system, but it hasn’t made anyone safer or meaningfully decreased the availability of drugs. That’s just one of the findings of a new report from the Pew Research Center, which examines the drastic rise in the number of people being sent to prison for drug offenses in the 1980s and 1990s.

DEA driving OxyContin abusers to heroin

The result of the War on Drugs in the 1980s and 1990s was to fill one-quarter of America’s prison cells with drug offenders. The availability of street drugs remained unchanged, and the price of heroin and cocaine dropped by more than half. Drug dealers also began to sell purer versions of heroin, cocaine, and marijuana. Recently, the DEA has shifted its focus to physicians who prescribe opioids such as OxyContin, some of which is undoubtedly diverted or abused, although sensation-seeking journalists fueled the perceptions of a “crisis.” The shift prompted a letter from the attorneys general of 30 states, who complained that patients were not getting needed pain relief because doctors were afraid to prescribe. “If enough doctors are jailed or scared into not writing prescriptions, it’s conceivable that this drug war could have more impact than the ones against heroin and cocaine—doctors, after all, are harder to replace than crack dealers,” writes John Tierney. “But even if there’s less OxyContin on the street, is that worth the suffering of patients who can’t get the prescriptions they need?” And what has been the impact on drug abuse? A field survey on drug use in Cincinnati by the White House drug-policy agency found that “because diverted OxyContin is more expensive and difficult to purchase, users have switched to heroin” (John Tierney, “Handcuffs and Stethoscopes,” NY Times 7/23/05).

U.S. Government Finally Admits Marijuana Really Does Kill Cancer Cells

The idea that cannabis kills cancer cells seems to no longer be a conspiracy theory in the United States. With this information, can any state legitimately say no to medicinal marijuana?

Or could it even be considered a preventative herb to avoid getting cancer?

Amy Willis with Metro says that the US government has added a page on the use of cannabis and cannabinoids to their official cancer advice website.

Willis advises, “The National Cancer Institute, part of the US Department of Health, now advises that ‘cannabinoids may be useful in treating the side effects of cancer and cancer treatment’ by smoking, eating it in baked products, drinking herbal teas or even spraying it under the tongue.”

The official government site has a long list of medicinal uses of cannabis, including:

Anti-inflammatory activity, pain relief, anti-anxiety, stress relief, anti-tumor, antiviral activity and relieving muscle spasms caused by multiple sclerosis, and many many more.

The site goes on to talk about how cannabis has been proven to destroy cancer cells in lab experiments.

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