Blog

Boycott Twitter/Saudi #Oct22 Justice for Jamal Khashoggi

By Ron’sSpot.org

Boycott Twitter

Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal has increased its stake in Twitter over the last six weeks to 5.17%, making him the second biggest shareholder after former CEO and co-founder Evan Williams.

Alwaleed, one of the richest men in Saudi Arabia, bought a 3% stake in the company in 2011 before it went public in 2013. The current stake of 35 million shares is worth $1 billion, and includes 30 million shares owned directly by the prince and five million by his Kingdom Holding Company.

Source: Saudi prince now owns 5% of Twitter

Boycott FOX News

How ironic is it that the FOX News where Sean Hannity has been howling about Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf wanting “Sharia law” to replace our existing laws is the very same FOX News whose parent company, the Rupert Murdoch controlled News Corporation, has as its second largest shareholder Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal

Fox News owner Rupert Murdoch has partnered with Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal to launch a new 24-hour news network for the Arab world, a move that has drawn mockery from Murdoch’s critics and questions from media experts.

The new channel, based in Saudi Arabia, “will focus on development in Saudi Arabia and the Arab world on the political, economic and social fronts,” Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, the world’s 19th-wealthiest person according to Forbes, said in a statement.

Source: Sharia Prince Owns Stake In FOX News Parent

Boycott Coca-Cola 

Aujan Coca-Cola Beverages Company (ACCBC) and Rani Refreshments (RR) were established in 2012 following the successful establishment of a partnership between The Coca-Cola Company and Aujan Industries.

RR is the trademark owner to premier beverages brands including Rani and Barbican, while ACCBC is an authorized manufacturer and distributor of its products in 15 countries across the Middle East and North Africa. ACCBC is also the licensed manufacturer in the Middle East for VIMTO.

Rani soft drink maker Aujan, an affiliate of Coca-Cola Co

If you have accounts with these firms close them: JPMorgan Chase & Co / Morgan Stanley / Citigroup Inc.

The American executives will want deals. Some, like Jamie Dimon, chief executive officer of JPMorgan Chase & Co., and Morgan Stanley boss James Gorman, already have agreements to advise oil giant Saudi Aramco on its initial public offering, which may be the largest ever. JPMorgan and Citigroup Inc. helped arrange a $17.5 billion Saudi bond sale last year and a $9 billion Islamic bond issue in April. This weekend the banks will aim for more contracts as the Saudis prepare to sell other state assets.

If you own these stocks sell them: Boeing Co. / Lockheed Martin Corp. / General Electric Co. / Halliburton Co.

Boeing Co. CEO Dennis Muilenburg and Lockheed Martin Corp. head Marillyn Hewson will be looking to cement defense sales. Aramco could sign at least 10 deals with companies including General Electric Co. and oil field-service businesses Schlumberger Ltd. and Halliburton Co. to open manufacturing plants in the kingdom, people familiar with the plans say.

WHAT’S NEXT?

Write, call, let your voice be heard:

Western support of regimes that murder people for apostasy can only exist in the shadows. If you vote for your local representatives on the basis of their standing on realpolitik and morally repugnant deals that are justified by some vaguely defined “national interests”, a lot of “friends” will have to change their ways.

What can your Congress member do? 

1.) Domestic oil and gas production – the more the better.
2.) Nuclear energy in addition to renewables – hydrocarbons should not be used to produce electricity for large networks, period.
3.) Base arms (weapons) sales on human rights abuses/progress.

To call your Member of Congress: US Capitol Switchboard (202) 224-3121 To locate your Member on-line: U.S. House of Representatives: www.house.gov U.S. Senate: www.senate.gov

What can you do?

Switch to a hybrid car.

Don’t visit Saudi Arabia.

Walk or ride a bike whenever possible.

Ride the bus, the train and carpool as often as possible.

Boycott dates.

To call Fox News, dial 1-888-369-4762. This is also the phone number provided for offering news tips.

Be prepared to go through a series of phone prompts when you dial the number. These prompts will direct you to the person or department you need to speak with.

The main address for Fox News Channel is 1211 Avenue of the Americas New York, NY 10036.

Fox News lists emails for its many programs so that viewers can send comments to hosts or show producers. The general email for comments is yourcomments@foxnews.com. All emails end with @foxnews.com. Here is the list:

You can reach Sean Hannity at hannity@foxnews.com and
Reach Geraldo  atlarge@foxnews.com.
America’s Newsroom w/ Bill and Martha can be emailed at americasnewsroom@foxnews.com.
Email Cavuto on Business at cavuto@foxnews.com
Email friends@foxnews.com for Fox & Friends.
Fox News Specials can be reached at fncspecials@foxnews.com
Fox Report can be written at foxreport@foxnews.com

If you live outside the United States but watch Fox News on the Internet or on television, let them know by sending an email to FOXaroundtheworld@foxnews.com.

Twitter Phone Number (415) 222-9670 Corporate Offices

Address Twitter, Inc. 1355 Market St. Ste. 900San Francisco, CA 94103

Address The Coca-Cola Company
P.O. Box 1734
Atlanta, GA 30301, USA

(800) 438-2653

Justice for Jamal Khashoggi

October 22-A National Day of Mourning

On October 22nd, we stand as one people, without color, creed or division. We are one.

OCT. 22ND A NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER AND CALM

This is a call for a day of prayer and calm. To mourn the dead. This is a non-violent protest. A day of remembrance, not a day for violence.

1.) To participate we call on everyone everywhere to wear black to mourn the dead.

2.) Do not go to work, or to school or to church, as remembrance of the dead.

3.) No shopping. Do not spend one dime on October 22nd. No buses, no trains and no planes for one day to show our solidarity with those who have been murdered.

Continue reading: Justice for Jamal Khashoggi

Independent alternative media, ad free. To support this work donate HERE  And thank you for your support. Please share.

Want more?

BAE accused of secretly paying £1bn to Saudi prince

Why is Trump rewarding Saudi war crimes with more weapons?

Saudis take 100% control of America’s largest oil refinery

Justice for Jamal Khashoggi

By Christopher R Rice

October 22-A National Day of Mourning

On October 22nd, we stand as one people, without color, creed or division. We are one.

OCT. 22ND A NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER AND CALM

This is a call for a day of prayer and calm. To mourn the dead. This is a non-violent protest. A day of remembrance, not a day for violence.

1.) To participate we call on everyone everywhere to wear black to mourn the dead.

2.) Do not go to work, or to school or to church, as remembrance of the dead.

3.) No shopping. Do not spend one dime on October 22nd. No buses, no trains and no planes for one day to show our solidarity with those who have been murdered.

For more: (How to) Boycott Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman was the prince who George Nadar had represented when offering the Kingdom’s help securing the election for Trump. At the time of Trump and Kushner’s visit, bin Salman was not the heir to the throne.

Months before he was stripped of his security clearance, Kushner did what Trump did not: he read the daily briefs. And he used his clearance to collect additional information. And in October 2017, Kushner paid a secret visit to Prince Mohammad bin Salman to deliver what he had learned: The names of other members of the Saudi royal family who were opposed to bin Salman’s rule. Less than two weeks after Kushner’s visit, Riyadh and sites around the kingdom were filled with the sounds of gunfire and wailing sirens as bin Salman carried out an “anti corruption” campaign to clear his opposition.

Kushner’s list was undoubtedly handy for bin Salman, and less handy for the people on the other end of the purge who were imprisoned, beaten, or tortured to death.

By NBCNews

U.S. intelligence intercepts show Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered that Jamal Khashoggi, a missing Washington Post columnist, be enticed to return from the United States to Saudi Arabia so that he could be detained, the Washington Post reported.

The newspaper, citing unidentified U.S. officials it described as familiar with the intelligence, said the information provides additional evidence of alleged official Saudi involvement in Khashoggi’s disappearance after he entered the country’s consulate in Istanbul, Turkey.

President Trump says the United States is going to get to the bottom of the disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi and said there will be “severe punishment” if Saudi Arabia is found responsible.

“There’s a lot at stake, a lot at stake. And maybe especially so, because this man was a reporter,” Trump said. “There’s something — you may be surprised to hear me say that, but there’s something really terrible and disgusting about that if that were the case. So we’re going to have to see. We’re going to get to the bottom of it and there will be severe punishment.”

(Reuters) – Saudi Arabia is preparing to acknowledge the death of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi in a botched interrogation, CNN and the New York Times said on Monday, after U.S. President Donald Trump speculated “rogue killers” may be responsible.

A pro-government Turkish daily published preliminary evidence last week from investigators who it said had identified a 15-member Saudi intelligence team that arrived in Istanbul on diplomatic passports hours before Khashoggi disappeared.

The group is said to have included Salah Muhammad al-Tubaigy, forensic evidence chief of the Saudi Arabia’s security department. Tubaigy was among the Saudi officials who arrived in Turkey on the same day that Khashoggi disappeared in Istanbul.

On Oct. 12, Saudi Arabia‘s interior minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Saud bin Naif condemned the “lies and baseless allegations” against the kingdom, although he praised the joint investigation with Turkey.

Benchmark Brent crude rose $ 1.49 a barrel to a high of $ 81.92 on Monday.

It comes after Saudi Arabia issued a thinly veiled threat to reduce oil production if the United States imposes sanctions for the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

An Arabic-language newspaper from Saudi Arabia, Okaz, said in an English headline on Monday: “Do not test our patience.”

“The kingdom affirms its total rejection of any threats and attempts to undermine it, whether through economic sanctions, political pressure or repeating false accusations,” the kingdom’s statement said. “The kingdom also affirms that if it is [targeted by] any action, it will respond with greater action.”

The president said he was sending Pompeo to Saudi Arabia to investigate the kidnapping.

“Here we go again with you’re guilty until proven innocent,” Trump told the Associated Press in an interview. Trump had used a similar formulation of language when his nomination of Brett Kavanuagh to the U.S. Supreme Court ran into trouble.

When Pompeo concluded his visit, Trump sent a tweet revealing his conversation with the crown prince and the Saudi leader’s denial on behalf of the royal family of any involvement in the alleged Khashoggi murder.

“I just spoke with the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, who totally denied any knowledge of what happened at his Turkish consulate,” Trump said. “He was with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo during the call and he told me that he had already started, and will quickly expand, a full and complete investigation into this matter.” Answers will be given shortly.

“He said it very firmly,” Trump said when pressed to give his opinion on the reliability of the Saudi king.

The State Department later announced that Pompeo would make a visit to Turkey on its trip to continue the search.

Trump declined to comment on reports that Khashoggi died in an unauthorized interrogation after claiming that the journalist may have been taken out by unscrupulous murderers.

“I just do not know, I’m going to have to see what they say, and we’re working very closely with Saudi Arabia and Turkey, and we’re working together to find out what happened, and they also want to know what happened.

In an interview with Fox Business Network that will be broadcast on the network on Tuesday night, Trump said that “it will determine a lot”. after Pompeo concludes his talks on Saudi Arabia.

Reportedly, MBS placed its own mother under house arrest earlier this year as part of a seizure of power that, according to him, dealt with the repression of internal corruption.

Pompeo appeared in Riyadh with a smile on his face on Tuesday to meet the crown prince, despite new reports from Turkey that found evidence of Khashoggi’s assassination at the Saudi consulate.

Khashoggi was heard shouting in the audio until he was injected with an unknown substance by one of 15 Saudi hit men sent to the country to kill him.

Details of the tapes have been shared with US intelligence agencies but kept from the public for fear of revealing the secrets of Turkish surveillance, according to The Washington Post.

Turkish officials have concluded that whatever the intent of the operation, Khashoggi was killed inside the consulate. Investigators have not found his body, but Turkish officials have released video surveillance footage of Khashoggi entering the consulate on the afternoon of Oct. 2. There is no footage that shows him leaving, they said. The intelligence about Saudi Arabia’s earlier plans to detain Khashoggi have raised questions about whether the Trump administration should have warned the journalist that he might be in danger.

President Trump rejected reports on Tuesday that suggested his personal business interests are tied to the alleged involvement of Saudi Arabia in the disappearance of journalist Khashoggi at the Istanbul consulate in the nation.

Trump said in a tweet that “there are no financial interests in Saudi Arabia” and suggestions to the contrary are “FALSE NEWS” after a segment of Fox & Friends. At the heart of similar claims are the Saudi government’s payments to the president’s hotels. The kingdom is one of its best customers.

Related: President Trump’s hotel received $270,000 from Saudi Arabia

In 2001, Trump sold an entire floor of Trump World Tower to the government of Saudi Arabia. The apartment complex in New York City is located across from the United Nations. The purchase was valued at $ 12 million, according to CBS.

“Saudi Arabia — and I get along great with all of them. They buy apartments from me. They spend $40 million, $50 million. Am I supposed to dislike them? I like them very much.”

The first Trump Organization project to launch after his inauguration … was in the UAE.

The first country that Trump visited after assuming office … was Saudi Arabia.

With a $ 110 billion arms deal at stake, Trump and other US officials have been reluctant to blame Salman’s reign for the alleged murder of the Washington Post columnist who had become an outspoken critic of the government. Saudi.

“Boeing, Lockheed, Raytheon, all these com… I don’t want to hurt jobs. I don’t want to lose an order like that” Trump said.

Trump told reporters that he does not want to jeopardize jobs and businesses for Americans by punishing Saudi Arabia, if it were responsible, with sanctions that affect the purchase of weapons.

“I just spoke with the Saudi king who denies any knowledge of what may have happened to our Saudi citizen.” Trump said in a tweet.

Khashoggi’s description as “our Saudi citizen” pushes Trump away from the disappearance of the Washington Post columnist who, according to Turkey, was tortured, murdered and dismembered by Saudi assassins.

Khashoggi was a U.S. resident who wrote columns for the Washington Post and he was critical of the Saudi government, calling for reforms.

(AP) — Facing an electoral defeat that could imperil his presidency, President Donald Trump said Tuesday that he won’t accept the blame if Republicans lose the House in November, arguing that he is “helping people” in the midterms.

In a wide-ranging interview with The Associated Press, Trump also accused his longtime personal attorney Michael Cohen of “lying” under oath, defended his use of the derisive nickname “Horseface” for porn actress Stormy Daniels and argued that the widespread condemnation of the Saudis in the disappearance of a Washington Post columnist was a rush to judgment.

Want more?

BAE accused of secretly paying £1bn to Saudi prince

Why is Trump rewarding Saudi war crimes with more weapons?

Saudis take 100% control of America’s largest oil refinery

Iraqi Militia Finds Horrifying Pics of Slave Market in Saudi Arabia

The child slaves of Saudi Arabia

Saudi officials were ‘supporting’ 9/11 hijackers, commission member says

President Trump’s hotel received $270,000 from Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia releases video on National TV teaching husbands how to beat their wives

Crash that will send Dow down 17,000 points

By Stephanie Landsman

He’s a market watcher known for making bold calls spanning decades. Now, Harry Dent is arguing that the Trump rally is setting investors up for an inevitable stock market crash.

Investors have embraced President Donald Trump’s victory by sending stocks on a tear to new record highs. Dent, however, thinks there’s trouble brewing.

“I think this is going to be a stock market peak of a lifetime followed by a crash very similar to the early 1930s. This happens once in a lifetime,” Dent Research Founder Harry Dent recently told NBC’s “ Futures Now .”

He added: “I think this is the last rally in this bull market.”

Dent may be calling for the rally’s last hurrah, but he’s also forecasting another jump for the Dow over the next few days.

“The markets are assuming that he is going to create three to four percent growth on a sustainable basis,” said Dent. “It is demographically impossible…. When the markets figure this out, they are going to crash.”

Dent makes the case that the U.S. workforce will see negative growth, estimating that the population will grow just over a quarter percent over the next 50 years. He also points to rock bottom productivity that not even tax cuts can solve in the immediate term.

“You can’t have stocks keep going up at this rate when earnings are going nowhere,” said Dent. “”I think it [Dow] is going to end up between 3000 and 5000 by next year.”

Dent, who is also the editor of the “Survive & Prosper” newsletter, says there are other major factors which will spark an ‘epic’ pullback.

“I think the trigger is people seeing that Donald [Trump] will not be able to do everything that he said, and the economy will be slowing by then,” he said. “The biggest trigger, kind of like the subprime crisis in 2008, is going to be Italy. Italy is bankrupt. Its bonds are trading at lower rates than ours which is ridiculous.”

Not only could Italy send the European markets into a tailspin, Dent is also particularly worried about China.

The world’s second largest economy “has the greatest real estate bubble, an overbuilding bubble, in all of modern history. That’s going to blow, ” warned Dent.

Yet, he says that this could also be the best time in decades to re-position for huge gains. “In the next few months, investors will have the best opportunity to switch their investment strategies and profit dramatically,” he said.

“I make bold forecasts, and especially with things like [quantitative easing] and massive government intervention — yes, I’m going to miss some things. But, I have the guts to make these bold calls,” argued Dent.

Want more?

Several noted economists and distinguished investors are warning of a stock market crash.

Jim Rogers, who founded the Quantum Fund with George Soros, went apocalyptic when he said, “A $68 trillion ‘Biblical’ collapse is poised to wipe out millions of Americans.”

And the prophetic economist Andrew Smithers warns, “U.S. stocks are now about 80% overvalued.”

Smithers backs up his prediction using a ratio which proves that the only time in history stocks were this risky was 1929 and 1999. And we all know what happened next. Stocks fell by 89% and 50%, respectively.

Even the Royal Bank of Scotland says the markets are flashing stress alerts akin to the 2008 crisis.

They told their clients to “Sell Everything” because “in a crowded hall, the exit doors are small.”

Blue chip stocks like Apple, Microsoft, and IBM will plunge.

But there is one distinct warning that should send chills down your spine … that of James Dale Davidson. Davidson is the famed economist who correctly predicted the collapse of 1999 and 2007.

Davidson now warns, “There are three key economic indicators screaming SELL. They don’t imply that a 50% collapse is looming – it’s already at our doorstep.”

And if Davidson calls for a 50% market correction, one should pay heed.

Indeed, his predictions have been so accurate, he’s been invited to shake hands and counsel the likes of former presidents Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton — and he’s had the good fortune to befriend and convene with George Bush Sr., Steve Forbes, Donald Trump, Margaret Thatcher, Sir Roger Douglas and even Boris Yeltsin.

They know that when Davidson makes a prediction, he backs it up. True to form, in a new controversial video, Davidson uses 20 unquestionable charts to prove his point that a 50% stock market crash is here.

Most alarming of all, is what Davidson says will cause the collapse. It has nothing to do with the China meltdown, Wall Street speculation or even the presidential election. Instead, it is linked back to a little-known economic “curse” that our Founding Fathers warned our elected officials about … a curse that was recently triggered.

Bankruptcy guru Edward Altman sees similarities to 2007 in the credit market today By Julia LaRoche

Legendary bankruptcy expert Dr. Edward Altman cautioned that this benign credit cycle — characterized by low default rates, low yields, low spreads, and lots of liquidity — could come to an abrupt end.

“It’s been a terrific market for investors for quite a long time and if anything is concerning it’s that we now are more than ten years into a benign credit cycle,” Altman, a professor at NYU Stern School of Business, told Yahoo Finance. “We’ve never had such a long benign cycle. And just that one little fact is something that we should be concerned about because if it comes to one and it could come to an end very dramatically.”

Altman, the creator of the financial-distress sniffing Altman Z-Score, warned in mid-2007 of a “Great Credit Bubble” and that there was going to be trouble in the market. He predicted that a meltdown would stem from corporate defaults. While the primary culprit of the financial crisis turned out to be mortgage-backed securities, investors who heeded Altman’s warning nevertheless avoided a lot of grief.

So, how does today’s market compare to the market in 2007.

“There are some similarities, yes, although the situation back in the great financial crisis was pre-meditated by the mortgage-backed securities and we don’t have that problem now,” he said.

Troublingly, Altman sees the reckless behavior of 2007 surfacing again.

“Back in 2007 prior to the crisis in ’08 and ’09, the fundamentals of credit risk of the companies issuing bonds and taking out loans were quite low,” he said. “And the similarity that I see now between 2007 and 2016 is very similar fundamentals, quite a bit high risk and it doesn’t seem to bother the market because it’s the only game in town in terms of getting yield greater than what you can get for low-risk securities like governments and high-grade corporates.”

In other words, investors aren’t buying junk bonds just because the risk-reward balance is favorable. They’re buying because the rewards of investing in lower risk bonds just aren’t cutting it anymore.

Altman is perhaps best known for the Z-Score, a formula he created 50 years ago that’s used to predict bankruptcies. Since that time, he noticed that bankruptcies have gotten increasingly bigger.

“[What] I’ve seen over the years is larger and larger companies filing for bankruptcy on a regular basis. On average, in the United States, something like 15 more than $1 billion companies, in terms of liabilities, go bankrupt every year, on average,” Altman said. “This year already it’s 13. Last year, it was almost 40.”

He noted that inflation has something to do with it, but what’s actually happening is companies have been taking advantage of debt and low interest rates like never before, and the corporate debt ratios are way up.

“Speaking about the Z-score, if you compare the average Z-score of companies in 2007 with the average in 2016, which is the last time we looked at it, guess what. The average is actually lower today than it was in 2007, and 2007 was right before the great financial crisis, and of course, in ’08 and ’09 we saw a tremendous increase in corporate bond defaults and loans.”

Low Z-scores are associated with financial distress.

He added: “So the good news is that it’s no worse, but the bad news is, fundamentally, the companies are no better than they were back in 2007 at least by our model.”

At the moment what’s keeping companies from going bankrupt as they did during the financial crisis is the incredible amount of liquidity and low interest rates.

Fake growth, fake money, fake jobs, fake financial stability, fake inflation numbers

Nobody knows when reality will overtake the rhetoric, lies, phony statistics, wishful thinking, fake prices and tiresome poseurs pretending to be world leaders. The situation is universal, a consequence of incompetent leaders and careless (or ignorant) citizenry. Global problems are continuing to mount, along with the risk that the consequences of years of bad policies and inept leadership compound (as sometimes happens) in a short window of time.

Unemployment figures are also a source of faulty or misleading data.  A 35-year low in the workforce participation rate, a policy-driven transition from full-time to part-time jobs, and the transition from high-paying jobs to relatively low-paying service jobs, all combine to make the headline rate a poor measure of employment health. Support for our statement is provided by the data on real wages, which have been stagnant during the entire post-crisis period.

Guggenheim’s Minerd warns of a possible replay of 1987 stock market crash By Jennifer Ablan, Reuters

Investors should brace for a possible replay of the 1987 stock market crash later this year, given this month’s slump came against the backdrop of Federal Reserve interest rate hikes and rising inflation, Scott Minerd, Global Chief Investment Officer at Guggenheim Partners, said on Tuesday.

On Monday Oct. 19, 1987, following large declines on Asian and European markets the previous week, the Dow Jones Industrial (.DJI) Average plunged 508 points, or 22.6 percent, for the biggest-ever single day decline in percentage terms by the blue-chip benchmark.

“Today, investors have the same sorts of concerns they had in 1987,” Minerd said. By August 1987, equities were at record highs, the Fed was raising rates, the U.S. dollar was under pressure and there were increasing concerns over inflation, Minerd noted.

“The concern was the Fed was behind the curve as it accelerated rate increases,” he said. “By October, things were becoming unhinged. Bond yields had risen in the face of an extended bull market in stocks. The market reached a tipping point and began its infamous slide.”

As the Fed continues to raise rates this year, valuations of risk assets based upon faith in ultra-low rates and central bank liquidity will come into question, Minerd said.

JIM ROGERS: The worst crash in our lifetime is coming

“We’ve had financial problems in America — let’s use America — every four to seven years, since the beginning of the republic. Well, it’s been over eight since the last one.

This is the longest or second-longest in recorded history, so it’s coming. And the next time it comes — you know, in 2008, we had a problem because of debt. Henry, the debt now, that debt is nothing compared to what’s happening now.

In 2008, the Chinese had a lot of money saved for a rainy day. It started raining. They started spending the money. Now even the Chinese have debt, and the debt is much higher. The federal reserves, the central bank in America, the balance sheet is up over five times since 2008.

It’s going to be the worst in your lifetime — my lifetime too. Be worried.”

The End of Social Security
By Christopher R Rice

The U.S. was the largest creditor in the world. Now the debt is in the trillions of dollars. Trillions of dollars transferred from the worlds richest and most powerful country. This is a form of destructive economic management at a level of graft and corruption that has NO parallel. There’s nothing comparable to that in history.

The national debt is in the trillions of dollars, even our kids will never see it paid off. As the administration and Congress argue over cuts in social programs, inequality in America grows more extreme each day. Even the great financial crash didn’t derail this trend. The richest 400 Americans, for example, increased their wealth by 54 percent between 2005 and 2010, while the median middle-class family saw its wealth decline by 35 percent.

It’s not the result of mysterious global forces, or technology, or China, or structural problems concerning the skills and education of our workforce. Rather, it is the direct result of policy choices made by Democrats and Republicans alike.

The U.S. policy (includes tax policy, financial deregulation, trade policy, anti-labor policy, and much more.) for the past 30 years has been aggressively dedicated to shifting income share away from the poor and middle class and into the pockets of the already rich.

The top 1 percent of the U.S. population now owns about a third of the wealth in the country. Since the late 1970s wealth inequality, while stabilizing or increasing slightly in other industrialized nations, has increased sharply and dramatically in the United States.

Instead of taxing the Super Rich our politicians want to slash social programs, after school programs, instead of making corporations pay their fair share, our politicians want to take a knife to social security and Medicaid.

TRUMP and SOCIAL SECURITY

Back in 2000, Trump wrote a book in which he referred to Social Security as a “Ponzi scheme”, proposed increasing the retirement age to 70, and claimed, “Privatization would be good for all of us.” As recently as 2011, he said he was on board with plans to cut Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid — but that Republicans should be very careful “not to fall into the Democratic trap” by doing it without bipartisan support, or they would pay the price politically.

I think most people remember what happened to all of the mentally ill in this country when Ronald Reagan switched to block grants for the states? Which is what they plan to do to Medicaid and Medicare. People with mental disabilities were thrown out into the streets, where they remain today. The same thing is about to happen to Americas senior citizens. The wall that Trump keeps talking about building along our southern border is not to keep the refugees out, but to keep us in.

According to economic journalist, David Cay Johnston, author of “Perfectly Legal,” this trend is not the result of some naturally occurring, social Darwinist “survival of the fittest.” It is the product of legislative policies carefully crafted and lobbied for by corporations and the super-rich over the past 25 years. New tax shelters in the 1980s shifted the tax burden off capital and onto labor. As tax shelters rose, the amount of federal revenue coming from corporations fell (from 35 percent during the Eisenhower years to 10 percent in 2002). During the deregulation wave of the ’80s and the ’90s, members of Congress passed legislation (often without reading it) that deregulated much of the financial industry.

If corporations paid taxes, our government could have a surplus – roads, dams, hospitals and schools would not be in disrepair or overcrowded because the government would have plenty of money for all these things as they once did and would not be looking for ways to cut social security or other social programs.

Want more?

Debt Bubble(s) and the Digitization Of All Trade

Business tax payments plunge, while workers pay more

Homeless U.S. Veterans

Socialism for the super rich and Capitalism for the poor

War on Poverty FAILURE

To support this work donate HERE  And thank you for your support.

Boycott: Maine, Lobster (Senator Susan Collins)

By David Millward, The Telegraph

Businesses in Maine are facing a backlash after  Susan Collins, the state’s Republican senator, decided to back the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.

Two of Maine’s biggest industries,  lobster fishing and tourism, are facing a consumer boycott following Ms Collins’ key vote in the most hotly contested appointment to the Supreme Court since that of Clarence Thomas in 1991.

The state’s lobster industry is already reeling because of the punitive tariffs imposed by China as a result of the trade war launched by the Trump Administration.

The Senate confirmed Mr Kavanaugh by 50 votes to 48 with Lisa Murkowski, another Republican, voting against his appointment but Joe Manchin, a Democrat from West Virginia, backing President Trump’s nominee.

Ms Collins had been one of the waverers as Mr Kavanaugh faced a wave of sexual misconduct allegations, which he angrily denied.

His confirmation infuriated women’s rights campaigners and the controversy has shown little sign of abating in the aftermath of the vote.

A crowdfunding campaign has already raised $3 million for any Democrat who runs against Ms Collins in 2020.

The boycott campaign took off when John Fugelsang, a comedian and actor, took to Twitter to voice his disgust to his 413,000 followers.

“Dear Susan Collins – I really struggled with this but my tourist $ just voted against ever visiting Maine while you remain in office,”  he tweeted.

Mr Fugelsang has since said he was only joking, but already people have been voting with their wallets.

They include John Tesar, the owner of six restaurants in Texas, who spends hundreds of thousands of dollars on Maine seafood every year.

He said he will look elsewhere in order to encourage Maine’s fishermen to vote her out of office.

“My intention was not to harm the Maine fishing industry, but to encourage people to take a stand for what they believe in, especially come election day, to remove people who supported Kavanaugh, and subscribe to his treatment of women,’ he said.

“Moving forward, I will educate myself on the source of the seafood we use in my restaurants and understand who is providing it and who they support politically, to make better decisions.

Mark Murrell, who runs GetMaineLobster.com, is among the businesses which bore the brunt of those incensed by Ms Collins’ vote.

“We had customers who have contacted us saying they are boycotting us because of her speech and vote,” said Mr Murrell.

“Basically they want businesses like ours to hustle and vote her out. But she is not up for re-election until 2020.

“But we have also had people from the other side who, after they read the story, contacted me and said they were going to order more.”

Mr Murrell said he had written to Senator Collins following her decision. “I was not happy with the course she took.”

The Telegraph approached Senator Collins’ office, which declined to comment.

To support a free press donate here. Support it or lose it.

Sources:

Trump Put Former Soros Partner In Charge of Economy

Report: Jared Kushner Didn’t Disclose $1 Billion in Loans, Investment Ties to Goldman Sachs and George Soros

George Soros Bailed Out Trump Towers AND Spent a Christmas Eve With Donald Trump

Top 10 Donors to the Trump Campaign

Five Times Brett Kavanaugh Appears to Have Lied to Congress While Under Oath

Email Marked ‘Confidential’ by GOP Shows Kavanaugh Pushed for John Yoo, Legal Architect of Bush Torture Program, to Be a Federal Judge

Confidential emails reveal Kavanaugh wanted to make author of Bush-era torture memo a judge

NSA metadata program “consistent” with Fourth Amendment, Kavanaugh once argued

Kavanaugh, Klayman, and the Fourth Amendment

Old Kavanaugh email questioning if Roe v Wade is ‘settled law of the land’ revealed

How Brett Kavanaugh Will Gut Roe v. Wade

Brett Kavanaugh may have a perjury problem

Hypocrisy in Kavanaugh case enough to set off alarms in DC

On National Security, Kavanaugh Has a History of Extreme Deference to the President

If I Didn’t Know This Was All Rigged, I’d Think Brett Kavanaugh Is in Serious Trouble

Khashoggi Is Not Alone

By Journeyman Pictures

Kidnapped: The Lost Princes: Saudi Arabia – a key ally of the UK and America – has been ruled as an absolute monarchy since its foundation. Any opposition in the country is often brutally oppressed. BBC Arabic has been investigating allegations the Saudi monarchy has operated a system of illegal abduction and capture of dissident princes who have criticised the government, including evidence of princes kidnapped in Europe and forced back to Saudi Arabia, where they’ve not been heard from since. Reda El Mawy reports.

Related: How to Boycott Saudi Arabia

To support this work donate HERE  And thank you for your support.

Want more?

BAE accused of secretly paying £1bn to Saudi prince

Why is Trump rewarding Saudi war crimes with more weapons?

Saudis take 100% control of America’s largest oil refinery

Iraqi Militia Finds Horrifying Pics of Slave Market in Saudi Arabia

The child slaves of Saudi Arabia

Saudi officials were ‘supporting’ 9/11 hijackers, commission member says

President Trump’s hotel received $270,000 from Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia releases video on National TV teaching husbands how to beat their wives

Saudi Arabia’s stock market plunges on fear of sanctions over Khashoggi

By

Shares in Saudi Arabia plunged as the fallout over the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi got worse over the weekend.

The main stock market index in Riyadh fell as much as 7% on Sunday and billions of dollars were wiped off the value of leading Saudi companies. The index recovered some ground later to close 3.5% down.

Stocks have dropped as much as 9% since Khashoggi disappeared on October 2 after walking into the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. The losses wiped out all the market’s gains in 2018, although it is still up 8% from a year ago.

For more than two years, the kingdom has been on an ambitious plan to modernize and diversify its economy away from oil. The plan, known as Vision 2030 and spearheaded by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, aims to increase foreign investment, boost tourism and grow the private sector.

Related: American hypocrisy President Trump calls for ‘severe punishment’ if Saudi Arabia killed Jamal Khashogg

According to a United Nations report earlier this year, direct foreign investment in Saudi Arabia fell to $1.4 billion in 2017, the lowest level in 14 years.

Still, the Saudi economy has been recovering from a recession and investors were encouraged earlier this year when index compiler MSCI granted the country emerging market status. That means that stocks traded in Saudi Arabia can now be included in broader funds, making it easier for investors around the world to put their money into the kingdom’s economy.

But the unexplained disappearance of Khashoggi, a former Saudi government adviser turned critic, has already prompted some big-name business partners to cut ties with projects that are central to Saudi’s plans of building a modern economy with technology at its core.

Related: Corruption Scandal Trump-Kushner, Saudi Arabia-UAE

Turkish authorities claim to have evidence that Khashoggi, a US resident and columnist for the Washington Post, was murdered inside the consulate — an accusation the kingdom strenuously denies.

British billionaire Richard Branson has pulled back from two projects to develop Red Sea tourism and has suspended talks with the Saudi government about a $1 billion investment in his space companies.

“What has reportedly happened in Turkey … if proved true, would clearly change the ability of any of us in the West to do business with the Saudi government,” he said in a statement.

And a huge investment conference dubbed “Davos in the Desert”, scheduled for later this month, has seen some leading speakers and participants drop out. Most international media partners have pulled their sponsorships.

Related: (How to) Boycott Saudi Arabia

President Donald Trump has vowed that the United States will get to the bottom of what happened to Khashoggi, and has warned of “severe punishment” if he were found to have been killed in the consulate.

In a statement on Sunday, the kingdom said it rejected any threats of economic sanctions or political pressure and would retaliate accordingly.

“Markets start to price in a fundamental change in the nature of the relationship between the US and Saudi Arabia,” said Jaap Meijer, managing director and head of equity research at Arqaam Capital. “We believe it is not warranted given the long term relationship between the two countries, and Saudi being the swing oil producer.”

Saudi Arabia has been pumping more oil into global markets to make up for a shortfall created by Trump’s decision to reimpose sanctions on Iran.

There’s now some doubt about whether US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin will attend the Riyadh conference. At the closing press conference of the International Monetary Fund meeting in Bali, Indonesia, on Saturday he said he still planned on going.

But speaking later that day in the Oval Office, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo would not confirm that Mnuchin would attending the Future Investment Initiative.

“I think we need to continue to evaluate the facts and we’ll make that decision,” he said.

The BBC reported on Sunday morning that UK Trade Secretary Liam Fox may also pull out.

Debt Bubble(s) and the Digitization Of All Trade. Fake growth, fake money, fake jobs, fake financial stability, fake inflation numbers.

BAE accused of secretly paying £1bn to Saudi prince

Why is Trump rewarding Saudi war crimes with more weapons?

Saudis take 100% control of America’s largest oil refinery

Iraqi Militia Finds Horrifying Pics of Slave Market in Saudi Arabia

The child slaves of Saudi Arabia

Saudi officials were ‘supporting’ 9/11 hijackers, commission member says

President Trump’s hotel received $270,000 from Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia releases video on National TV teaching husbands how to beat their wives

Corruption Scandal Trump-Kushner, Saudi Arabia-UAE

By Mark Sumner

This may seem like a whole new scandal from the Trump-Russia investigation, a completely different story. But it’s not. It’s all of a piece. It’s all the story of how Donald Trump admires powerful people and treasures his business connections over everything else. Everything.

While the discovery that Donald Trump Jr. hosted a soiree that included representatives for UAE and Saudi princes there to offer their assist to the Trump campaign may seem shocking, but it shouldn’t be. After all, these are Trump’s people. These are the people who have multi-million dollar investments in Trump golf courses and Trump hotels. These are the people who Trump sold $50 million apartments.

“Saudi Arabia — and I get along great with all of them. They buy apartments from me. They spend $40 million, $50 million. Am I supposed to dislike them? I like them very much.”

The first Trump Organization project to launch after his inauguration … was in the UAE.

The first country that Trump visited after assuming office … was Saudi Arabia.

And the first thing that all of them did was take revenge on Qatar, a country that had repeatedly turned down Donald Trump’s attempts at launching a development, had backed out of a loan to Jared Kushner, ran a news source that published uncomfortable truths about the Saudi royal family, and had the audacity to actually support the Iran nuclear deal. It may have been the world’s greatest shakedown, one that started with a $110 billion arms deal for Saudi Arabia, includes a $1.2 billion loan for Jared Kushner, and still isn’t over.

A senior member of the Saudi royal family recently told me that word around the royal palaces is that President Trump pays attention when business is in the offing.

The full impact of what he meant has only just started to sink in.

George Nader, a political adviser to the de facto ruler of the U.A.E., and Elliott Broidy, the deputy finance chairman of the Republican National Committee — was pushing the White House to remove Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson, backing confrontational approaches to Iran and Qatar and repeatedly pressing the president to meet privately outside the White House with the leader of the U.A.E.

In a memorandum to Mr. Nader about the Oval Office meeting on Oct. 6, Mr. Broidy reported that he personally urged Mr. Trump to fire Mr. Tillerson, whom the Saudis and Emiratis saw as insufficiently tough on Iran and Qatar.

Mr. Nader pleaded guilty in 1991 to a federal child pornography charge and served six months at a halfway house after videotapes were found in his luggage when he arrived at Washington Dulles International Airport from a trip to Germany, according to court records released last week. In 2003, he received a one-year prison sentence in the Czech Republic after he was convicted there of 10 cases of sexually abusing minors, The Associated Press reported, citing a court spokeswoman.

The story of Donald Trump, his son-in-laws Jared Kushner, and their support for Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in the isolation and assault on Qatar isn’t something that has played out in secret. It was right there, and it was obvious. As the United States delivered a fresh shipment of 6,000 missiles to the Saudis and warships sat off the Qatar coast, Donald Trump made no effort to disguise the fact that he was playing favorites among U.S. allies. Trump and Kushner were partying in Riyadh, Qatar was losing $20 billion a month, and it was all exactly as they planned.

In February 2017, Donald Trump Jr. and Eric Trump were on hand for a party in Dubai. Celebrating the opening of the Trump International Golf Course Dubai, the Trumpsvlavished praise on the leadership of the UAE. Eric Trump declared that the opening was just the beginning of “a lot of fun years together.” Both sons took the stage with the UAE-based developers that had funded the project. Meanwhile, back in Washington, Donald Trump casually mentioned that he had turned down a $2 billion deal with those developers after the election, saying that he didn’t want to “take advantage.”

Neither of them mentioned that Donald Trump Jr. had welcomed representatives from the UAE and Saudi Arabia to Trump Tower the previous August, to talk about how they might help Trump win the White House. Just as in the meeting that was held with Russian operatives, it was all perfectly innocent—so innocent that they covered up the event until it was revealed in the New York Times.

Two months after the Trump sons were celebrating in Dubai, Donald Trump hit the ground in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. It was Trump’s first out-of-the-country trip, and the first time that any president had chosen Saudi Arabia over close allies like Canada or the UK for that honor. He was there to meet with Saudi leaders, touch the orb, and sign off on the largest arms deal in the history of the world.

That deal had originated in 2016, when the government began assembling a package containing updated tanks, warships, helicopters, and thousands of missiles. However, Saudi Arabi’s aggressive moves toward Yemen—in particular the deliberate targeting of a funeral procession for one of thousands of airstrikes—put the deal on hold, and the Obama administration announced that it would halt some arms sales and review the entire military relationship between the United States and Saudi Arabia.

Trump moved quickly to restore those sales. The $110 billion deal he brought to Riyadh didn’t just set a record, it included the weapons the Saudis wanted to attack the Iran-allied Houthis across the border.

But the visible activities during Trump’s visit were clearly not the whole of what was discussed. Both Trump and Jared Kushner spent time with King Salman bin Abdulaziz. The 82-year-old ruler became king after both his brother and half-brother died in 2015. The Americans also spent considerable time with the King’s son, Prince Mohammad bin Salman. Bin Salman was the prince who George Nadar had represented when offering the Kingdom’s help securing the election for Trump. At the time of Trump and Kushner’s first visit, bin Salman was not the heir to the throne. That was about to change.

What Trump and the Saudi leadership talked about is no secret at all. Less than two weeks after Trump arrived in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia abruptly closed the land border to its tiny neighbor, Qatar. Within hours, the UAE and Bahrain announced that they were closing their ports and airports against their neighbor. Qatar was presented with a list of demands, some of which insisted that Qatar break ties with any group that the other states, or the United States, considered a terrorist organization. But if that demand seemed almost reasonable, the rest of the list included closing Al Jazeera and any other news organization, closing a military base belonging to NATO member Turkey, not “interfering” in the affairs of other Arab states, following Saudi Arabia’s lead in foreign policy, and paying an unspecified sum to compensate Saudi Arabia and the UAE for “loss of life and other financial losses caused by Qatar’s policies.”

Qatar was given 10 days to comply. If it complied, the document promised that Qatar’s neighbors would relent—but only after they put their own troops on the ground in Qatar, imposing an “audit” on the country that would have to be met on a monthly basis. Neither side of the disagreement seems to have believed that Qatar ever would, or even could, surrender to the demands.

George Nader, convicted of possessing child porn, poses with Donald Trump in 2017. Photo: AAP

Well before that 10 days were up, a cascading set of restrictions were imposed on the Gulf peninsula. Warships set off the coast, keeping away shipping. Qatari airliners were forbidden to land at many airports. Shipping out of the country was essentially eliminated. Imports, roughly half of which had previously come across the border from Saudi Arabia, were restricted to what could be brought in by air, much of it from Turkey. The losses to Kuwait were estimated at $20 billion a month.

Two weeks after the blockade was launched against Qatar, on  June 21, a mini-coup took place in Saudi Arabia. King bin Abdulaziz, who had already changed the line of succession once when he became king, did so again, making his son, the 32-year-old bin Salman, the next ruler. The move set bin Salman up to be leader of the country for decades—and in fact, many already saw him as the de facto ruler. The formal change also included the opening rounds of a purge that would see hundreds of Saudi princes, family members, and ministers forced from power over the remainder of 2017. Though bin Salman was represented as a “reformer,” and famously supported lifting the ban on women driving in the kingdom, his reforms mostly seem to consist of raking the assets of ousted relatives into his own coffers, jailing civil rights campaigners, clamping down on the already restricted press, upping Saudi Arabia’s involvement in Yemen, and starting the fight with Qatar.

Bin Salman’s moves had one central focus: Prepare to go to war with Iran.

Saudi Arabia has a fresh injection of U.S. weaponry, an abiding antipathy for Iran, and a fresh young ruler at the helm who Trump views as a friend. Equally important, bin Salman replaced Prince Mohammed bin Nayef, who was close to the leaders of Qatar and had previously kept Saudi Arabia from taking steps to isolate its small neighbor. With bin Salman at the helm, Trump had someone who would support him in the effort to break the Iran nuclear deal. Trump tweeted his support of bin Salman, and of the blockade of Qatar. The largest U.S. military base in the Middle East was under blockade by nations that were U.S. allies, to which the United States had just given a record amount of arms, with the support of the U.S. administration.

It wasn’t just Trump who was taken by bin Salman. Kushner also felt he had found someone who would help him with his problems. He not only stayed with the prince on Trump’s official visit, he’s been back. And if Donald Trump had come bearing gifts in the form of arms, Jared Kushner had something else.

Months before he was stripped of his security clearance, Kushner did what Trump did not: he read the daily briefs. And he used his clearance to collect additional information. And in October 2017, Kushner paid a secret visit to bin Salman to deliver what he had learned: The names of other members of the Saudi royal family who were opposed to bin Salman’s rule. Less than two weeks after Kushner’s visit, Riyadh and sites around the kingdom were filled with the sounds of gunfire and wailing sirens as bin Salman carried out an “anti corruption” campaign to clear his opposition.

Kushner’s list was undoubtedly handy for bin Salman, and less handy for the people on the other end of the purge who were imprisoned, beaten, or tortured to death. But if Kushner thought that “the two princes” were close friends, bin Salman apparently saw it differently. When bin Salman checked in with UAE Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed—the other leader who George Nader had represented in that visit to Donald Trump Jr.’s office—bin Salman let the UAE leader know that he had Jared Kushner “in his pocket.”

Of course he did. Because what the Saudis and UAE understood from before the election was simple enough: Donald Trump and Jared Kushner could be bought. And having been bought, Trump and Kushner delivered on their end of the deal, whether the payoff was in the form of missiles for the arsenal, permission to harm a U.S. ally, or an enemy list. Bin Salman and bin Zayed did very, very well out of their associations with Trump.

Everything worked out in the end for Jared Kushner, as well. In January, and again in February, visiting Qatari officials thought about going to Robert Mueller. They could show him the information they had collected on Jared Kushner, including his willingness to deal in top secret information to gain the friendship of the future Saudi king. But the Qataris worried about retaliation—and for very good reason. Considering the price they had already paid, and were still paying, it seems entirely reasonable to assume that exposing Trump or Kushner might only result in more aggression directed at Qatar.

Instead, they took a different routeEarlier this month, 11 months after the start of the blockade, and just over a year after Qatar dropped out of the deal to finance Jared Kushner’s mid-town boondoggle, Qatar is back in. The Qatari Investment Authority, working through Brookfield Asset Management, decided that it would fund the 666 Fifth Avenue project after all. And, in fact, appears to be ready to put in considerably more than Qatar had committed to bring in the initial round of financing. But even if Qatar gives Kushner a profit, it will be considerably less than the $20 billion a month they continue to bleed due to the embargo. Whether that embargo will continue is the next big question. There were 13 points on the list of demands sent to Qatar, but it may turn out there was only one real requirement.

To support this work donate HERE  And thank you for your support.

References

2010 — Donald Trump and Ivanka Trump visit Qatar in an attempt to interest the state investment authority in a portfolio of “distressed real estate” he is assembling. But the meeting is unsuccesful and Trump feels insulted.

2011 — Jared Kushner visits Qatar in effort to secure funding for the 666 Fifth Avenue project, but is unsuccessful.

2013 — Donald Trump and a Dubai developer firm enter into a development deal to build a resort in the UAE.

2015 — Jared Kushner and his father Charles negotiate for financing from the Qatar sovereign wealth fund, and secure a deal that is contingent on getting most of the money for redevelopment of the property from some other source.

Aug 03, 2016 — Donald Trump Jr. hosts a meeting with Blackwater CEO Erik Prince, Republican strategist George Nader, and Israeli social media specialist Joel Zamel. Trump Jr. is reportedly enthusiastic about a plan to use former intelligence officers to provide “an edge” to the Trump campaign’s social media team. Nader informs Trump Jr. that princes from Saudi Arabia and UAE want to help the Trump campaign. Nader goes on to conduct multiple meetings with the Trump campaign, including meetings with Michael Flynn and Steve Bannon. While the New York Times report was the first to reveal the Trump Tower meeting hosted by Donald Trump Jr., earlier reports had already indicated that Mueller was interested in Zamel’s actions and in Nader’s connections to the campaign.

Jan 13 2017 — Erik Prince visits Seychelles to meet with Russian oligarch Kirill Dmitriev and officials from UAE in meeting arranged by Nader.

Feb 18, 2017 — Donald Trump Jr. and Eric Trump are both in the UAE for the opening of Trump International Golf Club Dubai. The course was the first Trump property project launched since their father’s inauguration.

Mar 29, 2017 — Chinese company Anbang Insurance Group drops out of talks to redevelop 666 Fifth Avenue. Anbang was to provide the principal financing behind a scheme that would knock down the existing 43-story office tower and replace it with a new $4 billion development. Part of those funds were to come from the Qatar sovereign wealth fund, but the loan from Qatar was contingent on the other financing.

Apr 24, 2017 — Jared Kushner’s father meets with the head of the Qatar sovereign wealth fund over two days in an attempt to find funding for the deeply underwater 666 Fifth Avenue office building, whose $1.2 billion mortgage comes due in February 2019. Earlier negotiations with Qatar had secured a promise of a $500 million loan, assuming that Kushner can come up with the remainder of the funds. However, Chinese investors pulled out before the election, and Jared Kushner has been unable to find another source. Without that other source in place, the Qataris back out of the deal. Kushner does not mention the meeting until it appears in the press three months later, at which point he claims that the meeting was just a “courtesy” and that it “would be inappropriate” to seek funds from a foreign government. Instead Kushner explains that the company wanted to avoid “even the appearance of impropriety.”

May 20, 2017 — Donald Trump and Jared Kushner arrive in Saudi Arabia on Trump’s first foreign trip. It was the first time that any U.S. president made Saudi Arabia his first trip outside the country, bypassing more traditional trips to Canada or the UK. On the visit, Donald Trump announced an arms deal for Saudi Arabia worth more than $100 billion, the largest arms deal in history. While there, Trump and Kushner met with both Saudi King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud and Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

May 22, 2017 — Trump signs $100 billion arms deal with Saudi Arabia, the largest in history.

Jun 5, 2017 — Saudi Arabia abruptly cuts access to Qatar’s only land border. Ships from Saudi Arabia, UAE, and Bahrain enforce a blockade as ports across the region are closed to Qatar-based ships. The blockading forces deliver a list of demands to the leaders of Qatar. That list includes:

  • Stopping support for any group that Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Egypt, Bahrain, or the United States designates as a terrorist organization.
  • Closing an air base belonging to NATO member state Turkey, and ceasing any military collaboration with the Turkish government.
  • Paying reparations to Saudi Arabia and the UAE for any loss of life “caused by Qatar’s policies”
  • Shuting down Al Jazeera and other Qatar-funded news outlets, and stop “interferring in the affairs of other sovereign countries.
  • Following Saudi Arabia’s lead on international policy.

Jun 6, 2017 — Rather than admonish the forces that are blocking a U.S. ally that hosts the largest U.S. military base in the Middle East, Donald Trump instead tweets that he heard from “leaders” in the region that Qatar is the source of funding for “radical ideology.” On the same day, Egypt and Libya follow the Saudi lead and begin turning away ships and flights from or to Qatar. For all practical purposes, commercial shipping to and from Qatar is shut down. The cost to Qatar from this point forward is estimated at $20 billion per month.

Jun 09, 2017 — Justice Department rules that there’s no problem with Donald Trump taking money from foreign governments without congressional approval.

Jun 21, 2017 — Saudi King Salman bin Abdulaziz rewrites the line of succession, ousting Prince Mohammed bin Nayef in favor of his son, bin Salman.

Oct 25, 2017 — Jared Kushner makes secret trip to Saudi Arabia where he provides Prince bin Salman with the names of opposition leaders.

Nov 10, 2017 — Saudi Arabian purge solidifies bin Salman’s control in name of “anti-corruption.”

Jan, 2018 — Qatari officials visiting the United States consider approaching Robert Mueller about evidence linking Jared Kushner to the actions of Saudi Arabia and UAE, but stop out of fear of retribution.

Feb 27, 2018 — Jared Kushner loses top security clearance.

Mar 17, 2018 — Kushner announces Qatar investment group will bail out the 666 Fifth Avenue property.

American hypocrisy President Trump calls for ‘severe punishment’ if Saudi Arabia killed Jamal Khashogg

ABC News v. The Underground

ABC News: President Trump calls for ‘severe punishment’ if Saudi Arabia killed Jamal Khashoggi originally appeared on abcnews.go.com

President Trump says the United States is going to get to the bottom of the disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi and said there will be “severe punishment” if Saudi Arabia is found responsible.

“There’s a lot at stake, a lot at stake. And maybe especially so, because this man was a reporter,” Trump said. “There’s something — you may be surprised to hear me say that, but there’s something really terrible and disgusting about that if that were the case. So we’re going to have to see. We’re going to get to the bottom of it and there will be severe punishment.”

The Underground: It’s great that the world is in a uproar over this, but why are we all ignoring the murder of a journalist in Bulgaria who published info about corruption?

ABC News: In a clip released from his “60 Minutes” interview, which will air Sunday night on CBS News, Trump says he still does not know if the journalist was killed by the Saudis.

However, recent reports from the Washington Post claim Turkish officials indicate they have audio and video proof Khashoggi was killed inside the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul.

The Underground: Even with undisputed evidence, Trump will never agree that they did it. What your seeing and hearing is not what’s really happening. I’ve learned from experience that whatever Trump proclaims, the opposite is going to be the actual truth.

ABC News: Khashoggi, a journalist for the Washington Post, disappeared earlier this month after he visited the Saudi consulate in Istanbul for routine paperwork. Surveillance footage released by the Turkish government shows Khashoggi, a vocal critic of the Saudi kingdom, entering the consulate.

There is no evidence he left afterward, leading Turkish officials to say they believe he was killed.

The mystery surrounding Khashoggi’s disappearance and Saudi Arabia’s alleged involvement has led to several companies and public figures to distance themselves from the kingdom and boycott an upcoming summit.

Related: How to Boycott Saudi Arabia

ABC News: The president said the Saudis vehemently denied any involvement when Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, directly asked Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman about the incident.

The Underground: Trump has called for attacks on American journalists, because as Trump claims they are “the enemy of people.” But are we supposed to believe that Trump cares about one Muslim journalist 8,000 miles away? When the Trump Organization was granted three permits from the Saudis for three Trump Resorts? Both Trump boys flew to Saudi a few months ago to break ground. Now we have this charade to squeeze the Saudi’s for something more.

ABC News: “It’s being investigated. It’s being looked at very, very strongly. And we would be very upset and angry if that were the case. At this moment they deny it and they deny it vehemently. Could it be them? Yes,” Trump said.

But when asked whether or not he would potentially impose sanctions against Saudi Arabia, Trump said that it depends on what the sanctions are. He noted that major defense contractors secured a deal with the Saudis to build military equipment and he wouldn’t want any punishment to cost American jobs.

“Boeing, Lockheed, Raytheon, all these com… I don’t want to hurt jobs. I don’t want to lose an order like that. There are other ways of punishing. To use a word that’s a pretty harsh word but it’s true,” Trump said.

A bipartisan group of Senators wrote a letter to Trump last week seeking an investigation into Khashoggi’s disappearance that could trigger sanctions.

Trump on Friday said he will be calling King Salman to discuss the disappearance of the journalist. So far, the White House has not yet indicated that call has happened.

The Underground: So says the guy who was thrilled to join in the sacred Wahhabi sword dance and bowed down to the princes to be anointed as an honorary mullah? Trump says, there will be “severe punishment” if Saudi Arabia is found responsible.’ LMAO!!, yeah right.

Of course they are going to deny killing a US citizen. They denied their involvement in 9-11 as well, but understand that while we’re focused on nations like Iran and North Korea, we embrace our true and greatest enemies in Saudi Arabia and Pakistan. These are nations that have directly attacked us and murder US citizens and we need to start treating them as such.

Jamal Khashoggi: Turkey claims to have videos of Saudi journalist’s torture

World leaders rounded on Saudi Arabia’s all-powerful crown prince yesterday as suspicions grew that he had personally ordered the killing of the missing journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

The Turkish authorities are reported to have obtained audio and video recordings which prove that he was interrogated, tortured, killed and dismembered there during a visit to the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

Details of the tapes have been shared with US intelligence agencies but kept from the public for fear of revealing the secrets of Turkish surveillance, according to The Washington Post.

“The moments when Khashoggi was interrogated, tortured and murdered were recorded in the Apple Watch’s memory,” daily Sabah said, adding that the watch had synched with his mobile phone which he had handed to his fiancee waiting outside the consulate.

Meanwhile, a delegation from Saudi Arabia arrived in Turkey for a joint investigation into Khashoggi‘s disappearance.

Two senior Turkish officials previously told Reuters that Khashoggi had been wearing a black Apple watch when he entered the consulate and that it was connected to a mobile phone he left outside.

However, it was not clear whether data from Khashoggi‘s watch could have been transmitted to his phone outside, or how investigators could have retrieved it without obtaining the watch themselves.

Sabah, which cited “reliable sources in a special intelligence department” for its report, said Khashoggi was believed to have turned on the recording feature on the phone before entering the consulate.

The paper said Saudi intelligence agents had realised after he died that the phone was recording and they used his finger print to unlock it, deleting some files, but not all of them. The recordings were
subsequently found on his phone, it said.

Khashoggi entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2 to get documents for his forthcoming marriage. Saudi officials say he left shortly afterwards but Turkish officials and his fiancee, who was
waiting outside, said he never came out.

Turkish security sources, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the initial assessment of the police was that Khashoggi had been deliberately killed inside the consulate.

On Oct. 12, Saudi Arabia‘s interior minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Saud bin Naif condemned the “lies and baseless allegations” against the kingdom, although he praised the joint investigation with Turkey.

The French president said on Oct. 12 he is waiting for a clear picture on the disappearance of the prominent Saudi journalist.

“I am waiting for the truth and complete clarity,” Emmanuel Macron told France 24 broadcaster.

“What’s been mentioned is serious, very serious (…) France wants everything to be done so that we have all the truth on this case of which the first elements are extremely worrying,” he added.

Macron also said that he will talk to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman on this issue in the coming days.

U.S. President Donald Trump also said that he will speak with the Saudi King on the disappearence of U.S. citizen Khashoggi.

Saudi prince MBS ordered operation to lure and detain Jamal Khashoggi, U.S. intelligence intercepts reveal Washington Post

Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered an operation to lure Washington Post contributing journalist Jamal Khashoggi back to Saudi Arabia where he was to be detained, U.S. intercepts show. The whole torture, dismemberment, and death inside the Saudi embassy thing that apparently happened was a rendition gone bad, according to this report.

From Shane Harris at the Washington Post, whose reporting is based on descriptions of U.S. intelligence intercepts of Saudi officials discussing the plan:

The intelligence pointing to a plan to detain Khashoggi in Saudi Arabia has fueled speculation by officials and analysts in multiple countries that what transpired at the consulate was a backup plan to capture Khashoggi that may have gone wrong.

A former U.S. intelligence official — who, like others, spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss the sensitive matter — noted that the details of the operation, which involved sending two teams totaling 15 men, in two private aircraft arriving and departing Turkey at different times, bore the hallmarks of a “rendition,” in which someone is extralegally removed from one country and deposited for interrogation in another.

But Turkish officials have concluded that whatever the intent of the operation, Khashoggi was killed inside the consulate. Investigators have not found his body, but Turkish officials have released video surveillance footage of Khashoggi entering the consulate on the afternoon of Oct. 2. There is no footage that shows him leaving, they said.

The intelligence about Saudi Arabia’s earlier plans to detain Khashoggi have raised questions about whether the Trump administration should have warned the journalist that he might be in danger.

Intelligence agencies have a “duty to warn” people who might be kidnapped, seriously injured or killed, according to 2015 federal directive. “The obligation applies regardless of whether the person is a U.S. citizen. Khashoggi was a U.S. resident,” Harris writes.

The Trump administration’s response to the likely abduction and murder of Jamal Khashoggi is sickening.

Administration officials have not commented on the intelligence reports that showed a Saudi plan to lure Khashoggi.

“Though I cannot comment on intelligence matters, I can say definitively the United States had no advance knowledge of [Khashoggi’s] disappearance,” deputy State Department spokesman Robert Palladino told reporters Wednesday. Asked whether the U.S. government would have had a duty to warn Khashoggi if it possessed information that he was in jeopardy, Palladino declined to answer what he called a “hypothetical question.”

The intelligence pointing to a plan to detain Khashoggi in Saudi Arabia has fueled speculation by officials and analysts in multiple countries that what transpired at the consulate was a backup plan to capture Khashoggi that may have gone wrong.

A former U.S. intelligence official — who, like others, spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss the sensitive matter — noted that the details of the operation, which involved sending two teams totaling 15 men, in two private aircraft arriving and departing Turkey at different times, bore the hallmarks of a “rendition,” in which someone is extra­legally removed from one country and deposited for interrogation in another.

But Turkish officials have concluded that whatever the intent of the operation, Khashoggi was killed inside the consulate. Investigators have not found his body, but Turkish officials have released video surveillance footage of Khashoggi entering the consulate on the afternoon of Oct. 2. There is no footage that shows him leaving, they said.

The intelligence about Saudi Arabia’s earlier plans to detain Khashoggi have raised questions about whether the Trump administration should have warned the journalist that he might be in danger.

Intelligence agencies have a “duty to warn” people who might be kidnapped, seriously injured or killed, according to a directive signed in 2015. The obligation applies regardless of whether the person is a U.S. citizen. Khashoggi was a U.S. resident.

“Duty to warn applies if harm is intended toward an individual,” said a former senior intelligence official. But that duty also depends on whether the intelligence clearly indicated Khashoggi was in danger, the former official said.

“Capturing him, which could have been interpreted as arresting him, would not have triggered a duty-to-warn obligation,” the former official said. “If something in the reported intercept indicated that violence was planned, then, yes, he should have been warned.”

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence, which oversees the warning process, declined to comment on whether Khashoggi had been contacted.

Administration officials have not commented on the intelligence reports that showed a Saudi plan to lure Khashoggi.

“Though I cannot comment on intelligence matters, I can say definitively the United States had no advance knowledge of [Khashoggi’s] disappearance,” deputy State Department spokesman Robert Palladino told reporters Wednesday. Asked whether the U.S. government would have had a duty to warn Khashoggi if it possessed information that he was in jeopardy, Palladino declined to answer what he called a “hypothetical question.”

The intelligence poses a political problem for the Trump administration because it implicates Mohammed, who is particularly close to Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser.

On Wednesday, Kushner and national security adviser John Bolton spoke by phone with the crown prince, but White House officials said the Saudis provided little information.

Trump has grown frustrated, two officials said, after initially reacting slowly to Khashoggi’s disappearance. Earlier this week, he said he had no information about what had happened to the journalist.

Kushner’s relationship with Mohammed, known within national security agencies by the initials MBS, has long been the subject of suspicion by some American intelligence officials.

Why is Khashoggi so prominent? Fortune

Khashoggi, 59, has been a leading critic of Saudi Arabia’s current leadership, sharing his views via platforms including opinion columns in the Washington Post that began a year ago and were translated into Arabic. His journalism career has included stints in Afghanistan, where he met and followed the rise of al-Qaeda chief Osama bin Laden in the 1980s. He was deputy editor-in-chief of the Saudi newspaper Arab News at the time of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the U.S., which made him a valuable source for foreign journalists seeking to understand what drove some Muslims into such actions. In the 2000s, he was twice fired from his post as editor-in-chief of the Saudi Al-Watan daily newspaper, which under his leadership ran stories, editorials and cartoons critical of extremists and the way in which the country enforced its religious values. (Saudi newspapers are privately owned but government-guided, and the government approves and can fire top leadership).

Why did he go into exile?

He told friends and reporters that the space for freedom of speech under Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman was shrinking and he feared for his safety. In an appearance on Al Jazeera TV’s “Upfront” that aired in March, he said he’d left the kingdom “because I don’t want to be arrested.” On the worsening environment for journalists since Prince Mohammed took over, he said, “I got fired from my job twice because I was pushing for reform in Saudi Arabia. It wasn’t that easy but people were not being put in jails. There was a breathing space.”

What’s the Khashoggi family’s relationship with Turkey?

In Turkey, they’re known as the Kasikci family. Their most famous member until now was Adnan Khashoggi, the billionaire arms dealer whose biography is called “The Richest Man in the World,” and who in the 1980s sold his yacht, the Nabila, to Donald Trump. Adnan Khashoggi’s father was Turkish, a doctor who married a Saudi woman and became court physician to King Abdulaziz, the founder of modern Saudi Arabia. That marked the family’s rise to prominence in Saudi Arabia. However, they’ve kept their ties to Turkey. Another member of the family, Hasan Khashoggi, made the news in Turkey in 2017 when he survived a terrorist attack on the Reina nightclub in Istanbul, in which a gunman massacred 39 people.

Want more?

BAE accused of secretly paying £1bn to Saudi prince

Why is Trump rewarding Saudi war crimes with more weapons?

Saudis take 100% control of America’s largest oil refinery

Iraqi Militia Finds Horrifying Pics of Slave Market in Saudi Arabia

The child slaves of Saudi Arabia

Saudi officials were ‘supporting’ 9/11 hijackers, commission member says

President Trump’s hotel received $270,000 from Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia releases video on National TV teaching husbands how to beat their wives